Craig Brice joins Mines to lead Advanced Manufacturing program

Reposted from the Mines Newsroom:

An additive manufacturing expert with 20 years of industry and research experience at Lockheed Martin and NASA will lead the new Advanced Manufacturing degree program at Colorado School of Mines.

Craig Brice, currently a senior research scientist with the Advanced Technology Center at Lockheed Martin Space, will join the university in July as program director and professor of practice. He will teach two of the program’s four core courses, Introduction to Additive Manufacturing and Additive Manufacturing of Solid Materials.

Launching this fall, the interdisciplinary Advanced Manufacturing program will offer professional graduate certificates and non-thesis master’s degrees, as well as undergraduate minors and areas of special interest. Instruction will focus on additive manufacturing and data-driven process design and optimization, technologies that are rapidly maturing in the aerospace, automotive, defense, biomedical and energy industries both locally and worldwide.

“We are really excited that Craig Brice is joining the Mines faculty – he has been active in the metals additive manufacturing field for 20 years and is a pillar of the community. He has led certification programs for additively manufactured titanium parts for the Lockheed Martin F-35 program, advised national policy and programs and earned his PhD while working in industry,” said Aaron Stebner, Rowlinson Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and executive director of the Alliance for the Development of Additive Processing Technologies (ADAPT) at Mines. “Craig has decades of firsthand experience with the type of training that professionals need to advance the industry – he knows what professional students need as they go back for further training.”

Brice has spent his entire career working in additive manufacturing, particularly from the materials and processing side. At Lockheed Martin, Brice focused on metallic additive manufacturing and materials research and development for a variety of spaceflight applications. Prior to moving to Colorado, Brice worked at the NASA Langley Research Center in Virginia in its Advanced Materials and Processing Branch and at Lockheed Martin Aeronautics’ Advanced Development Programs in Fort Worth, Texas.

“The timing is right for a curriculum like this,” Brice said. “Over the past three to five years, additive manufacturing has really exploded as big companies like Lockheed Martin and GE have made sizable investments to try to streamline processes, reduce cost and improve performance. But there’s not a great talent pool that is knowledgeable about these additive processes – how to design with them, what it means for the materials, how to qualify parts for use. Students coming out of school with exposure to that will be one step ahead of everyone else.”

Brice previously taught at Mines as an adjunct professor, leading the new program’s pilot course, Introduction to Additive Manufacturing, twice over the past two years. He was a founding member of ADAPT and will rejoin the ADAPT board as its industry relations director. Brice holds a bachelor of science degree in metallurgical engineering from Missouri University of Science & Technology, a master of science in materials science and engineering from The Ohio State University and a PhD in mechanical engineering from the University of Canterbury.

“I’m excited to be joining Colorado School of Mines as it launches one of the first graduate training programs in advanced manufacturing in the U.S.,” Brice said. “There’s a huge demand in industry for people with even basic knowledge of these techniques – it’s a different way of thinking about how to go about manufacturing goods. If you’ve been doing it the conventional way, it’s time to adjust to the new paradigm.”

 

New Advanced Manufacturing degree program at Mines

Colorado School of Mines is proud to announce the Fall 2018 launch of a brand-new interdisciplinary degree program in Advanced Manufacturing!

The program will include a 12-credit-hour Professional Graduate Certificate, designed to give working professionals a competitive edge in the advanced manufacturing space with in-depth knowledge and practical application of additive manufacturing techniques and principles, structural materials for AM, statistical and machine learning tools for data-driven materials manufacturing, and designing parts for AM methods. The four required courses for the Professional Graduate Certificate will initially be offered on campus (morning or evening time slots).

Another option for graduates is the 30-credit-hour Master of Science, Non-Thesis (MSNT) degree. In addition to taking the core courses that form the basis for the Certificate, MSNT students will be able to specialize in one of two current tracks (Additive Manufacturing of Solid Materials and Data-Driven Materials Manufacturing) by choosing complementary electives from a list that spans seven departments at Mines.

Two options for undergraduates round out the program: a Minor and an Area of Special Interest.

The program’s strength is grounded in the expertise of Mines professors from Mechanical Engineering, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Physics, and Applied Mathematics and Statistics. Additionally, Mines has committed approximately $1M in a brand-new teaching lab and teaching-designed platforms to offer students hands-on access to cutting-edge AM technology.

Read the Mines press release here.

Contact the interim program director, Aaron Stebner, for more details.

TMS–MForesight workshop report available for download

ADAPT founding members Craig Brice of Lockheed Martin Space Systems and Bryce Meredig of Citrine Informatics were among the 40 leading expert participants in the TMS–MForesight workshop on Harnessing Materials Innovations to Support Next Generation Manufacturing Technologies in October 2017 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Craig Brice also served on the workshop organizing committee.

The goal of the interactive, professionally facilitated workshop was to forecast and brainstorm opportunity areas and enabling technologies related to materials science and engineering innovations that are likely to impact the next wave of U.S. manufacturing. The ideas generated by this workshop are documented in Harnessing Materials Innovations to Support Next Generation Manufacturing Technologies, available for free download through TMS. In addition to presenting thought-provoking insights into the potential future of manufacturing innovation, this technical report outlines actionable pathways and tactics identified to reach that future. This project was organized by TMS, on behalf of MForesight: Alliance for Manufacturing Foresight.

MForesight: Alliance for Manufacturing Foresight is a federally-funded consortium focused on enhancing U.S. manufacturing competitiveness by providing insights to decision makers on emerging technology trends and related priorities to inform policy and investments in advanced manufacturing. For information on events, projects, and activities, please visit the MForesight website.

Congressman Perlmutter visits the ADAPT Center

On Feb. 22, Colorado Congressman Ed Perlmutter visited Colorado School of Mines to tour the ADAPT Center and the Center for Space Resources. ADAPT Executive Director Aaron Stebner led the tour, showing Congressman Perlmutter ADAPT’s state-of-the-art characterization equipment and describing our cutting-edge data analysis and design of experiments capabilities enabled by adapt.citrination. View all pictures

Moog donates printer to Colorado School of Mines

ADAPT member company Moog has donated an EOS M270 Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) system to Colorado School of Mines to further advance additive manufacturing research collaboration between the ADAPT Center and the Laser Machining Group led by Dr. Jeff Squier. This generous donation will serve as a tool for the development and characterization of additively manufactured nonreactive metals and as a test bed for integrating with AM a first-of-its-kind femtosecond laser imaging and machining system.